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Posts from the ‘Podcasts’ Category

20
Mar
schroeder

The Traneumentary: Dave Schroeder (commentary)

There are great albums and then there are GREAT albums.

NYU Director of Jazz Studies Dave Schroeder fondly discusses John Coltrane’s playing and the beauty of “Lush Life” from one of his all-time favorite albums: Johnny Hartman & John Coltrane. Read moreRead more

3
Jan
anton_fig

The Traneumentary: Anton Fig (commentary)

Elvin Jones’ drumming featured on the John Coltrane Quartet recording A Love Supreme is legendary. Listen to drummer Anton Fig (Late Night with David Letterman) talk about Elvin’s masterful play on this commentary podcast episode from The Traneumentary series. Read moreRead more

3
Jan
patjim

Jim Hall and Pat Metheny Duo Redux

In 1999, guitarists Pat Metheny and Jim Hall released a historic duo recording. The result was a fulfilling musical meeting featuring the father of modern jazz guitar and one of his most skilled disciples who has achieved his own legendary status. Read moreRead more

19
Dec
ashley_kahn

The Traneumentary: Ashley Kahn

Ashley Kahn brilliantly breaks down the John Coltrane classic A Love Supreme in this popular Traneumentary episode. Read moreRead more

28
Nov
woodys

Celebrating Woody Shaw on Columbia

Woody Shaw’s albums on Columbia Records stand as some of the finest for the late trumpeter and composer. Woody recorded for Columbia from 1977-1981 and it was during this time that he become recognized for his unique voice as a band leader, composer and as a stylist on trumpet, coronet and flugelhorn which in turn solidified his spot in the legacy of brilliant jazz trumpeters. Read moreRead more

15
Nov
chick

Jazz Backstage: Chick Corea

Is there anything musically that Chick Corea can’t do? I don’t think so. Chick, who is a youthful 70 if you can believe it, could not be more busy, in demand and relevant to the jazz scene today. It is truly remarkable when you think of how many aspects of the music’s rich legacy Chick has been an active participate as well as a trailblazer and today, he still continues to push the limits of himself and the music. Read moreRead more

11
Nov
joniherbie

Celebrating Joni Through Herbie

Earlier this week Joni Mitchell celebrated her 68th birthday. And although she is not officially considered a jazz artist in the traditional sense it is no secret that she loves the music and has always incorporated a variety of aspects of it in her work… Read moreRead more

24
Oct
charles_tolliver

The Traneumentary: Charles Tolliver

Multi-talented trumpeter and bandleader Charles Tolliver shares his very personal story about John Coltrane – the man and his music. Read moreRead more

20
Oct
rudy

Rudy Van Gelder Reminisces

For anyone who loves and knows recorded jazz the name Rudy Van Gelder is a familiar one. Rudy has produced and recorded some of the greatest jazz albums of all-time and will forever be recognized as a leader in engineering, producing, recording and documenting much of the music’s greatest moments. Read moreRead more

18
Oct
altakefive

Jazz Backstage: Al Jarreau

Al Jarreau won the Grammy® for Best Jazz Vocal Performance in 1977 for the album Look To The Rainbow. The album’s success and award placed Al on the map as the leading and innovative jazz singer of the day. One of the album’s highlights was Al’s brilliant vocal interpretation of the Paul Desmond classic “Take Five.” Read moreRead more

23
Sep
myfavthings

The Traneumentary: Dave Liebman (bonus)

Saxophonist Dave Liebman’s enthusiasm for John Coltrane is infectious. You sit with Dave for a minute and bring up Coltrane and boom…his motor starts and you are treated to a wide range of facts, insights and personal reflections that are simply mesmerizing. Read moreRead more

23
Sep
johnduke

The Traneumentary: Dr. Billy Taylor (bonus)

It was a sincere privilege and honor to have Dr. Billy Taylor as the host & voice of the Traneumentary. When I originally contacted him to ask if he would be interested in participating, he had no idea what a podcast was but he was intrigued by the idea that this new broadcast medium could expand the audience of John Coltrane’s music. He generously agreed and provided a wealth of insight as well as encouragement to me and the production. Read moreRead more